EA Resources


100 new links and books

Links and books

Class Notes: Considering Context in Business Process Management: The BPM Context Framework

Jan vom Brocke, Sarah Zelt, and Theresa Schmiedel: In this note, we want to make the point that BPM needs to consider the context of a BPM initiative much more than is currently being done. The management of processes in organizations has moved from managing production processes to managing administrative processes, and today there is a need (and a chance) to move beyond incremental improvement of processes towards their complete innovation, particularly through digital technology. The methods used for process management, however, have not followed these developments, and they are essentially the same ones that were developed twenty years ago to streamline operational processes. We find that this causes two important problems: (1) the failure of BPM projects, as methods are used that do not fit the relevant context, and (2) the organizational renunciation of BPM in order to avoid such failure. However, we also find that BPM could successfully meet a variety of contemporary challenges. But in order to leverage this potential, BPM needs to be more sensitive towards the relevant context of its application. For this purpose, we recently developed a contextual framework to help identify and discuss relevant contextual factors and to develop skills and methods that are context-sensitive. It is referred to as the BPM Context Framework. We will introduce the BPM Context Framework in this note and show how it can be applied in BPM practice. The context factors of the BPM Context Framework can be enhanced through additional factors, and we invite everybody to engage in this discussion to help BPM become more context-sensitive and to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of BPM practices.
- Business Process Management -

Disciplined Agile 2.X

Disciplined Agile (DA) is a process decision framework for lean enterprises. The main characteristics of this framework are that it: is a people-first, learning-oriented hybrid agile/lean approach; has a risk-value delivery lifecycle; is goal-driven; is enterprise aware; is tactically scalable at the team level; and strategically scalable across all of the enterprise.
- Enterprise Architecture - Software Development -

Do We Need Product Managers?

John Cutler: After reading the 745th blog post trying to define product management and product ownership ….
- Product Management -

Cybersecurity Framework by NIST

Recognizing that the national and economic security of the United States depends on the reliable functioning of critical infrastructure, the President under the Executive Order "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity (link is external)" has directed NIST to work with stakeholders to develop a voluntary framework for reducing cyber risks to critical infrastructure. The Framework will consist of standards, guidelines, and best practices to promote the protection of critical infrastructure. The prioritized, flexible, repeatable, and cost-effective approach of the framework will help owners and operators of critical infrastructure to manage cybersecurity-related risk while protecting business confidentiality, individual privacy and civil liberties.
- Cybersecurity -

Baldrige Cybersecurity Excellence Builder: Key questions for improving your organization’s cybersecurity performance

The Baldrige Cybersecurity Excellence Builder is a voluntary self-assessment tool that enables organizations to better understand the effectiveness of their cybersecurity risk management efforts. It helps leaders of organizations identify opportunities for improvement based on their cybersecurity needs and objectives, as well as their larger organizational needs, objectives, and outcomes. Developed by NIST.
- Cybersecurity -

From EA to Enterprise Architecture 3.0

Ken Griesi and Beryl Bellman: The need for enterprises to efficiently and effectively deal with complexity and change has, perhaps, never been more prevalent than now.? Driving relevant and timely solutions for an enterprise demands a thorough understanding of the problem space and skillful bounding of the solution space prior to engineering a solution. Yet even as EAs faces these challenges, there are lessons to be learned from natural systems and an examination of CAS Theory. EA 3.0 stands upon the strong and steady shoulders of well-established principles that have survived the test of time. As John Zachman (2003) states, Seven thousand years of human history would establish that the key to complexity and change is architecture.

A fractal enterprise model and its application for business development

This paper by Ilia Bider, Erik Perjons, Mturi Elias, and Paul Johannesson suggests a new type of enterprise models called fractal enterprise models (FEM), with accompanying methodological support for their design. FEM shows interconnections between the business processes in an enterprise by connecting them to the assets they use and manage. Assets considered in the model could be tangible (buildings, heavy machinery, etc.) and intangible (employees, business process definitions, etc.). A FEM model is built by using two types of patterns called archetypes: a process-assets archetype that connects a process with assets used in it, and an asset-processes archetype that connects an asset with processes aimed to manage this asset (e.g., hiring people, or servicing machinery). Alternating these patterns creates a fractal structure that makes relationships between various parts of the enterprise explicit. FEM can be used for different purposes, including finding a majority of the processes in an enterprise and planning business change or radical transformation. Besides discussing FEM and areas of its usage, the paper presents results from a completed project in order to test the practical usefulness of FEM and its related methodological support.
- Enterprise Architecture - Systems Thinking -

Fully Digital Operations Will Be Necessity for Manufacturers

The digital revolution will radically change how companies operate their businesses on a daily level - their manufacturing plants, capital assets, supply chain and service, and product development. And the benefits in many cases will be enormous.
- Industry 4.0 -

A framework of information technology governance controls in acute healthcare

This thesis provides a framework of 25 information technology management controls to improve clinical IT systems implementation in hospitals. The research has identified external and internal risks associated with the implementation of clinical information systems and how hospitals can effectively manage those risks through mature IT governance practices.
- IT Governance -

Top 10 Emerging IoT Technologies

The technologies and principles of IoT will have a very broad impact on organizations, affecting business strategy, risk management and technical areas such as architecture and network design.
- Internet of Things -

Industry 4.0: Intelligent and flexible production

Bill Lydon: Industry 4.0 is a holistic automation, business information, and manufacturing execution architecture to improve industry with the integration of all aspects of production and commerce across company boundaries for greater efficiency. The term Industry 4.0 originated in Germany, but the concepts are in harmony with worldwide initiatives, including smart factories, Industrial Internet of Things, smart manufacturing, and advanced manufacturing.
- Industry 4.0 -

Introduction into Microservices

Oliver Wolf: This article explains the purposes and risks of microservice architectures. It further gives some hints on how an architecture must look like to met these purposes. At some points it also compares microservice to traditional service oriented architectures (SOA).
- Microservices -

EIRA v1.0.0

The European Interoperability Reference Architecture (EIRA), is an architecture content metamodel defining the most salient architectural building blocks (ABBs) needed to build interoperable e-Government systems. The EIRA provides a common terminology that can be used by people working for public administrations in various architecture and system development tasks. The EIRA was created and is being maintained in the context of the ISA Programme. The EIRA uses (and extends) the ArchiMate language as a modelling notation and uses service orientation as an architectural style. The EIRA is aligned with the European Interoperability Framework (EIF) and complies with the context given in the European Interoperability Strategy (EIS).
- Reference Models - Government EA -

Industry 4.0: Opportunities and challenges of the industrial internet

Whitepaper by PWC. The fourth industrial revolution %u2014 characterised by the increasing digitization and interconnection of products, value chains and business models %u2014 has arrived. German industry will invest a total of 40 billion euro in Industry 4.0 every year by 2020. Applying the same investment level to the European industrial sector, the annual investments will be as high as 140 billion euro per annum.
- Industry 4.0 -

The Internet of Things: Industrie 4.0 vs. the Industrial Internet

Kris Bledowski: ndustrie 4.0 and the Industrial Internet do not compete against one another—they are complementary. The two approaches occupy the same real estate of technology and they share some members. What unites them is the excitement about the future of the Internet of Things.
- Internet of Things - Industry 4.0 -

Current Standards Landscape for Smart Manufacturing Systems

NIST: Today’s manufacturers face ever-increasing demands of variability—greater customization, smaller lot sizes, sudden supply-chain changes and disruptions. Successful manufacturers will have to choose and incorporate technologies that help them quickly adapt to rapid change and to elevate product quality while optimizing use of energy and resources. These technologies form the core of an emerging, information-centric, Smart Manufacturing System that maximizes the flow and re-use of data throughout the enterprise. The ability of disparate systems, however, to exchange, understand, and exploit product, production, and business data rests critically on information standards. This report provides a review of the body of pertinent standards—a standards landscape—upon which future smart manufacturing systems will rely. This landscape comprises integration standards within and across three manufacturing lifecycle dimensions: product, production system, and business. We discuss opportunities and challenges for new standards, and present emerging activities addressing these opportunities. This report will allow manufacturing practitioners to better understand those standards useful to integration of smart manufacturing technologies.
- Industry 4.0 - Standards -

POSC Caesar Association

POSC Caesar Association (PCA) is a non-profit global-standardization member organization that shall promote the development of open specifications to be used as standards for enabling the interoperability of data, software and related matters. PCA initiated ISO 15926 Integration of life-cycle data for process plants including oil and gas production facilities, and is committed to its maintenance and enhancement.
- Standards -

Cooperation Among Two Key Leaders in the Industrial Internet

The Industrial Internet is important. New technologies and new business opportunities will disrupt industries on many levels. That much everybody seems to agree upon. Two organizations have dominated the headlines in this space: the Plattform Industrie 4.0, with its strong roots in the manufacturing industry, and the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), with its more cross-domain oriented approach.
- Internet of Things - Industry 4.0 -

Plattform Industrie 4.0 and Industrial Internet Consortium Agree on Cooperation

Representatives of Plattform Industrie 4.0 and the Industrial Internet Consortium met in Zurich, Switzerland to explore the potential alignment of their two architecture efforts - respectively, the Reference Architecture Model for Industrie 4.0 (RAMI4.0) and the Industrial Internet Reference Architecture (IIRA). The meeting was a success, with a common recognition of the complementary nature of the two models, an initial draft mapping showing the direct relationships between elements of the models, and a clear roadmap to ensure future interoperability. Additional possible topics included collaboration in the areas of IIC Testbeds and I4.0 Test Facility Infrastructures, as well as standardization, architectures & business outcomes in the Industrial Internet.
- Internet of Things - Industry 4.0 -

Plattform Industrie 4.0

With over 250 participants from more than 100 organisations, Plattform Industrie 4.0 is the largest and most diverse Industrie 4.0 network worldwide. Even at this early stage, Plattform Industrie 4.0 in its current form is a model for many other countries.
- Industry 4.0 -

The Industry 4.0 Portal

The german innovation centre for industry 4.0 is a technology startup founded in January 2015 by highly-qualified engineers with years of industry experience and aspiring young entrepreneurs from the fields of business administration, IT, and logistics. The startup is based in Regensburg, Germany. Together with partners from Singapore, the Asian subsidiary i40sg was founded in February 2015 and is located in the German Centre in Singapore.
- Industry 4.0 -

Internet of Things Organizational Confusion

As industry begins to better understand the Internet of Things, there remains some confusion about the role of industry organizations supporting the concept and how they relate to each other.
- Internet of Things -

IEEE SA - P2413 - Standard for an Architectural Framework for the Internet of Things (IoT)

The Internet of Things (IoT) is predicted to become one of the most significant drivers of growth in various technology markets. Most current standardization activities are confined to very specific verticals and represent islands of disjointed and often redundant development. The architectural framework defined in this standard will promote cross-domain interaction, aid system interoperability and functional compatibility, and further fuel the growth of the IoT market. The adoption of a unified approach to the development of IoT systems will reduce industry fragmentation and create a critical mass of multi-stakeholder activities around the world.This standard defines an architectural framework for the Internet of Things (IoT), including descriptions of various IoT domains, definitions of IoT domain abstractions, and identification of commonalities between different IoT domains. The architectural framework for IoT provides a reference model that defines relationships among various IoT verticals (e.g., transportation, healthcare, etc.) and common architecture elements. It also provides a blueprint for data abstraction and the quality "quadruple" trust that includes protection, security, privacy, and safety." Furthermore, this standard provides a reference architecture that builds upon the reference model. The reference architecture covers the definition of basic architectural building blocks and their ability to be integrated into multi-tiered systems. The reference architecture also addresses how to document and, if strived for, mitigate architecture divergence. This standard leverages existing applicable standards and identifies planned or ongoing projects with a similar or overlapping scope.
- Internet of Things -

IOT-A: Internet of Things Architecture

IoT-A, the European Lighthouse Integrated Project has addressed for three years the Internet-of-Things Architecture, and created the proposed architectural reference model together with the definition of an initial set of key building blocks. Together they are envisioned as foundations for fostering the emerging Internet of Things. Using an experimental paradigm, IoT-A combined top-down reasoning about architectural principles and design guidelines with simulation and prototyping in exploring the technical consequences of architectural design choices.
- Internet of Things -

From Enterprise Architect to Opportunity Architect

This white paper marks the conclusion of the Digital Transformation Research Project, which was jointly conducted by the Vlerick Centre for Excellence in Enterprise Architecture and our partner LoQutus. Through a series of case studies on 13 organisations, both member and non-member organisations of the Vlerick Centre of Excellence in Enterprise Architecture, our aim was to gain insights in an organisation’s digital transformation journey, and, more specifically, in the involvement of Enterprise Architecture (EA) in this process.
- Enterprise Architecture -